120 Labs for Cisco CCNA 200-125 and CCENT Exams

Lab 115: Implementing IPv6 Addressing

IPv6 is the next generation of IPv4 IP addressing scheme. IPv6 addressing supports more addresses and security features than IPv4 IP addressing scheme. Most of the people think that configuring IPv6 addresses is difficult than IPv4. However, trust me, once you become familiar with the IPv6 you will find that configuring IPv6 addressing is lot easier than IPv4. However, some of the IPv6 concepts are really difficult to understand in the beginning. But if you have passion to learn nothing can stop you.

For the key features, ranges, types and other IPv6 concepts, visit the following link and understand each and everything you need to know before to enroll for the CCNA exam.

In this lab exercise, we will demonstrate how to configure IPv6 on Cisco routers using both the static and auto-configuration methods. The following figure shows the differences between IPv4 and IPv6 IP addresses.

 

 Feature  IPv4  IPv6
 Address length  32-bits, divided in to 4 octets 128-bits, divided in to 8 blocks
Address format Decimal (0-9) Hexadecimal (0-9, A-F)
Separation of octets/ blocks By period (.) By colon (smile
Total available addresses 4.3 billion 36 trillion
Local subnet group management Internet Group Message Protocol (IGMP) Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD)
Auto configuration Does not support Support
Type Unicast, Multicast, and Broadcast Unicast, Multicast, and Anycast
IP to MAC resolution Broadcast (ARP) Multicast Neighbor Solicitation
Network ID notation Subnet mask and CIDR Prefix notation
Example 192.168.1.100
255.255.255.0
(192.168.1.100/ 24)
2001: 0123: aabb:ccdd:: 1

To configure IPv6 addresses, we will use the following topology. Take a deep look at the following topology and understand how the routers are connected and what IP address ranges we are going to implement.

Create the preceding topology and connect all the routers to each other in Cisco Packet Tracer. In this lab exercise, we will first configure manual IPv6 addressing and then we will explain how to configure IPv6 addresses using the Auto-configuration feature.

Manual Configuration of IPv6 Addressing

1.  On Router1 configure the following IPv6 address:

Address: 2001: abcd: 0123: 1:: 1/ 64 
Method: manual 
Interface: fa0/ 0

2.  To configure the preceding IPv6 address, execute the following commands on Router1:

Router( config)# hostname Router1 
Router1( config)# ipv6 unicast-routing 
Router1( config)# interface fa0/ 0 
Router1( config-if)# ipv6 address 2001: abcd: 0123: 1:: 1/ 64 
Router1( config-if)# no shut 
Router1( config-if)# exit

3.  On Router2, configure the following IPv6 address:

Address: 2001: abcd: 0123: 1:: 2/ 64 
Method: manual 
Interface: fa0/ 0

4.  To configure the preceding IPv6 address, execute the following commands on Router2:

Router( config)# hostname Router2 
Router2( config)# ipv6 unicast-routing 
Router2( config)# interface fa0/ 0 
Router2( config-if)# ipv6 address 2001: abcd: 0123: 1:: 2/ 64 
Router2( config-if)# no shut 
Router2( config-if)# exit 
Router2( config)# exit 
Router2# show ipv6 interface brief

Configuring IPv6 Autoconfig Addressing

In the previous task, you have configured IPv6 addresses on Router1 and Router2 using the manual method. However, there is one more method that allows you configure IPv6 addresses automatically. In this task, we will explain how to configure IPv6 address between Router2 and Router3 using auto-configure feature.

For this, on Router2, first you need to define a subnet within which the Autoconfig feature will configure an IPv6 address on the fa0/ 1 interface of Router3, automatically. In this exercise, we will use the following IPv6 subnet:

2002: abcd: 0123: 1::/ 64

1.  Configure an IPv6 address on the fa0/ 1 interface of Router2

Router2( config)# ipv6 unicast-routing 
Router2( config)# interface fa0/ 1 
Router2( config-if)# ipv6 address 2002: abcd: 0123: 1:: 1/ 64 
Router2( config-if)# no shut 
Router2( config-if)# exit

2.  Now, move on Router3, execute the following commands to generate an automatic IPv6 address on the fa0/ 1 interface.

Router( config)# hostname Router3 
Router3( config)# ipv6 unicast-routing 
Router3( config)# interface fa0/ 1 
Router3( config-if)# ipv6 address autoconfig 
Router3( config-if)# no shutdown 
Router3( config-if)# exit 
Router3( config)# exit

3.  Verify that a new IPv6 address is configured on Router3, automatically, within the subnet you defined on the interface fa0/ 1 of Router2.

Router3# show ipv6 interface brief

Testing IPv6 Configuration

1.  To verify the connectivity between routers on the network, type the following commands on Router3:

Router3# ping 2002: abcd: 123: 1:: 1

Note: You should be able to communicate to Router2, because its fa0/ 1 interface IPv6 address is configured within the same subnet.

Router3# ping 2001: abcd: 123: 1: 1

Note: You should not be able to communicate to Router1, because its fa0/ 0 interface IPv6 address is configured in the different subnet, and we have not configured IPv6 routing yet.

Saving Network Topology

Now, you have configured IPv6 addresses on all the routers. Since we have still need to perform a lot of IPv6 routing exercises, hence we will save this configuration to perform the next exercises. For this, save the configuration on each router and also save the network topology name it as IPv6 Topology.

1.  To do so, run the copy running-config startup-config command one each router.

2.  On the Packet Tracer console, click File, select Save As.

3.  In the File name text box, type IPv6 Topology, and then click Save.

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